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TDDD58 12 hp /Interaction design project

Examination


Each of the four assignments described below have individual reports as well as a group presentation. The individual work (which will feed into the group work) is the basis for the assessment, but if you have not participated in the group work you will not pass the assignment. It is the level of knowledge that the student display that is graded, and not the amount of work shipped in.

The individual reports are handed in, in writing, in connection with the group's presentation of each assignment. If you cannot attend a critique session (the compulsory oral presentation of an assignment), you must notify your supervisor in advance. You must then complete a supplementary task, which is to interview a couple of team members about what was discussed at the critique session and the lessons you can learn from it. Submit then a summary of 1-2 pages to the supervisor. That way you get to take part of some of what you missed in the critique session.

Participation Report

Each group must have a Participation Report from the group sessions. Such a report (maximum one page) shall be handed in at the presentations for each task. It shall be written down in the report if someone has not been able to participate in group work meetings. It shall also be stated how that person has compensated for it. If no compensation is indicated the particular student can make an arrangement with the supervisor. This report makes it accordinfly clear whether someone has not been involved in the work. Note that it is not enough to be in place in the group work physically if your not there mentally. It must discussed with the supervisor immediately if someone can not participate in the group work, to come to an agreement on how it should be compensated.

Grading

Grades are calculated as the median of the four assignments. That means you have to have Grade 3 on one assignemnt, Grade 4 on one, and Grade 5 on two assignments to receive Grade 5 on the entire course. You need Grade 3 on two assignments and Grade 4 on two to receive Grade 4 on the entire course. Finally, you need Grade 3 on all the assignments to get Grade 3 on the entire course.

Individual Reports

Written report are made individually for the assignments in the course (except for the evaluation report in Assignment 4). They should always:

  • Have a cover sheet with assignment, course, names and social security numbers listed.
  • Be well-written. It should be spell-checked and properly proof read.
  • Handed in on paper at the presentation session.
  • Employ correct terminology in accordance the literature.
  • Have a clear structure (introduction, problem / challenge / question, methodology and implementation, results, discussion and conclusions).
  • Make use of clear references to the course literature showing that you read and udnerstood literature. Use an established reference style.

Example of a good individual report that exhibits a level of analysis where personal experiences are related to multiple references that also are related to each other. The example also shows that it is not about the length of the text, but rather about the level of knowledge displayed in it. The report is anonymized: Example report.

Methods Chapter

We have seen superficial method descriptions in the reports submitted earlier years. The purpose of describing the method is to give the reader a clear picture of what you have done, how and why. For us as examiners, it is also difficult to assess whether you understand what you are doing and why, if you write a poor method description. A well written methodology chapter should contain the following items and is always written in past tense:

  1. An introductory paragraph that gives an overview of what was done and why (general methodology). Justifiy decisions and make sure the methodological literature is referenced. Describe then for briefly:
  2. Procedure: The steps of the activity, how was that process implemented and why? How long did it take? Justifiy decisions and make sure the methodological literature is referenced. Sometimes it is so straightforward that you can skip the justification (why), but highlight deviations from the prescribed procedure.
  3. Materials: What materials were used to implement the activities? It can involve sketches, questionnaires, images, interview guides or observation guides (and what they covered in themes).
  4. Participants: What roles were there in the design team? People should not be named, but you still want to know who did what. Who were the users or other stakeholders interviewed or observed? What characterizes them? Roles, gender, age, etc. How many were they?

Sketchbooks

For higher grades on Assignment 1-3, you should submit individual sketchbooks (see below). Greenberg et al. (2011) give a good description of how sketchbooks work. We would like to highlight a few things about how to work with sketchbooks in this course.

A sketchbook is organized sequentially andit is a visual documentation of insights and ideas (see also Curtis (2002) and University of the Arts London (2007)). You free working memory resources by getting things out of your head andand down on paper. It also allows you to benefit from your insights by continuous reflection.

Visual representation is fundamental to all design, but a sketchbook is not about nice drawings. Functional sketching is all about getting ideas down quickly to avoid losing them and to explore alternatives. The quality of a sketchbook is all about quantity. On a larger design project you can expect hundreds of individual sketches. Exploration is the quality sought in sketchbooks.

A sketchbook is a physical book that you can take with you anywhere and you can paste things in. You never know where inspiration comes from and when, but when it pops up, you need to be able to get it down on paper so you do not lose it. The annotations in the sketchbook show how your design ideas are emerging. Use a question mark to annotate design problems that you sketch out possible solutions to (indicated by option 1, option 2, etc.). Assess them with +/- lists that provide the basis for decisions, which are marked with an exclamation mark. To annotate a sketchbook you accordingly need five symbols: ? option + - !

Hanna Johansson, alumni from LiU, has been kind to contribute with an example of a really good sketchbook.

References on sketchbooks:

Assignment 1: Research

Presentation during week 40.

Group Work

Conduct a user study with contextual inquiry. Each project participant must have completed at least one observation and / or interview. No written group report is made for this assignment, instead the group give an oral report with the aid of a sketch board that describes:

  • two personas
  • one or more scenarios that describe the current situation (choose between using task analysis, written scenarios or storyboards)
  • an objectives tree for the design

In writing, hand also in:

  • a page of text that describes your methodology step by step.
  • a participation report of no more than one page.

Individual Report

The individual report shall be based on personal experience done in group work. The focus is, therefore, on what you have done and observed in the context of the group's work. The instructions for individual reports and sketch books above should be followed.

  • For grade 3: The report shall, as results, include written up field notes from the contextual inquiry you made. In the discussion (about one page), the interview / observation you made is analyzed and what the meaning of your results mean for the group's work are discussed.
  • For grade 4 in addition: The literature for the task should properly be used to describe and analyze the work and draw lessons from it. Analysis implies that things you have read in various sources are put againsteach other and against observation and experience to build synthesized knowledge and to draw conclusions. What we 're after learning wise is that you focus on your own personal experiences from the assignment and put them in relation to what you read. It is not enough that the literature used to describe what you did. You also have to use what you have read to say something about what you have observed and experienced, and you have to use your observations and experiences to say something about what you read.
  • For grade 5 in addition: An individual sketch book (see Greenberg, et. al, 2011) where your own observations and reflections are illustrated and annotated, together with a brief description of the reasoning behind your ideas. A sketch book in this early phase can often take the form of an annotated scrapbook although the first initial ideas can also sketched down.

Reading Instructions

  • Arvola, M. (2007). A Use-qualities approach: Judgements in interactive media design. In Hernwall, P. (Ed.), The virtual: designing digital experience : a conference 2006, pp. 102-118. Handen, Sweden: School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University. http://www.ida.liu.se/~matar/arvola-virtual06.pdf (accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Greenberg, S., Carpendale, S., Marquardt, N., & Buxton, B. (2011). Sketching User Experiences: The workbook. Morgan Kaufmann. (chapter 1-4, and 6.4-6.5)
  • Holtzblatt, K., & Beyer, H. R. (2013). Contextual Design. In M. Soegaard, and R. F. Dam (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.. Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/contextual_design.html (accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Löwgren, J. (2013). Interaction Design - brief intro. In M. Soegaard, and R. F. Dam (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.. Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/interaction_design.html (accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Nielsen, L. (2013). Personas. In M. Soegaard, and R. F. Dam (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.. Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/personas.html (accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Novak, J. D., & A. J. Cañas. (2007). Theoretical origins of concept maps: How to construct them, and uses in education, Reflecting Education, 3 (1), 29-42.http://www.reflectingeducation.net/index.php/reflecting/article/view/41(accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Randall, D. & Rouncefield, M (2013). Ethnography. In M. Soegaard, and R. F. Dam (Eds.), The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.. Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/ethnography.html (accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Saffer, D. (2009). Designing for Interaction: Creating Innovative Applications and Devices (2nd Edition). New Riders. (chapter 1-5)

Lectures

Observe! Lectures are given in Swedish but we will book meetings with our English speaking students to meet one hour before or after each lecture to go through the contents of the lecture. This means that English speaking students who wish to train their Swedish can go to the Swedish lecture and then also get a shorter version of it in a small group session.

  • Lecture 1. Introduction (given in English)
  • Lecture 2. Human-computer interaction: Now and then
  • Lecture 3. Gathering and analysing data
  • Lecture 4. Personas, scenarios and setting objectives

Assignment 2: Ideation of Concepts

Presentation week 45.

Group Work

Develop concepts ideas together in the group, and then select one concept to detail and work through individually with a concept design form (Arvola, 2013). No written group report is made for this assignment, instead the group give an oral report with the aid of a sketch board that describes:

  • sketches of concept alternatives
  • a Pugh-chart
  • design decisions and joint synthesized concept proposal in a storyboard

In writing, hand also in:

  • a page of text that describes your methodology step by step.
  • a participation report of no more than one page.

Individual Report

The individual report shall be based on personal experience done in group work. The focus is, therefore, on what you have done and observed in the context of the group's work. The instructions for individual reports and sketch books above should be followed.

  • For grade 3: The report shall, as results, include an elaborated concept design form (Arvola, 2013). This means that each member of the group individually must take responsibility for working through a concept among all those that the group have developed. In the discussion (one page) the role and implications of your concept for the group's work is analyzed and discussed.
  • For grade 4 in addition: The literature for the task should properly be used to describe and analyze the work and draw lessons from it. Analysis implies that things you have read in various sources are put againsteach other and against observation and experience to build synthesized knowledge and to draw conclusions. What we 're after learning wise is that you focus on your own personal experiences from the assignment and put them in relation to what you read. It is not enough that the literature used to describe what you did. You also have to use what you have read to say something about what you have observed and experienced, and you have to use your observations and experiences to say something about what you read.
  • For grade 5 in addition: An individual sketchbook from the design work provided also collected along with a brief description of the reasoning behind your design choices.

Reading Instructions

  • Arvola, M. (2013). The Mediated Action Sheets: A Framework for the Fuzzy Front-End of Interaction and Service Design. In Crafting the Future: The 10th International European Academy of Design Conference. Gothenburg, Sweden, April 17 - 19, 2013. http://www.ida.liu.se/~matar/ead_2013_arvola.pdf (accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Greenberg, S., Carpendale, S., Marquardt, N., & Buxton, B. (2011). Sketching User Experiences: The workbook. Morgan Kaufmann. (chapter 1-4, and 6.4-6.5)
  • The Quality Portal. (2007) Pugh Analysis. http://thequalityportal.com/q_pugh.htm (accessed 2013-08-12).
  • Saffer, D. (2009). Designing for Interaction: Creating Innovative Applications and Devices (2nd Edition). New Riders. (chapter 6 and 9)

Lectures

Observe! Lectures are given in Swedish but we will book meetings with our English speaking students to meet one hour before or after each lecture to go through the contents of the lecture. This means that English speaking students who wish to train their Swedish can go to the Swedish lecture and then also get a shorter version of it in a small group session.

  • Lecture 5. Conceptual design

Assignments 3: Revisions of Ideas

Presentation week 48.

Group Work

Sketch sitemaps and interface storyboards / state diagrams (also called wireflows) and develop a paper prototype that you conduct aformative usability test on. Use Wizard of Oz, with initial mental model and think-aloud. Use other course participants as a test users (one per group member) and rotate the roles (eg. faciliator, observer, computer) in the group. The important thing is that everyone get to be observer and facilitator. You will get a chance to to start up testing with another group during a study class. No written group report is made for this assignment, instead the group give an oral report with the aid of a sketch board that describes:

  • the paper prototype (may alternatively be described using a demo video)
  • the results of the formative usability test
  • bring preferably also (not mandatory) sitemaps, wireflows or other overview of the structure of your system

In writing, hand also in:

  • a page of text that describes your methodology step by step.
  • a participation report of no more than one page.

Individual Report

The individual report shall be based on personal experience done in group work. The focus is, therefore, on what you have done and observed in the context of the group's work. The instructions for individual reports and sketch books above should be followed.

  • For grade 3: The report shall as results include written up notes from formative tests of the paper prototype with one user where you have been an observer. In the discussion (one page), observations and experiences you have done are analyzed and discussed.
  • For grade 4 in addition: The literature for the task should properly be used to describe and analyze the work and draw lessons from it. Analysis implies that things you have read in various sources are put againsteach other and against observation and experience to build synthesized knowledge and to draw conclusions. What we 're after learning wise is that you focus on your own personal experiences from the assignment and put them in relation to what you read. It is not enough that the literature used to describe what you did. You also have to use what you have read to say something about what you have observed and experienced, and you have to use your observations and experiences to say something about what you read.
  • For grade 5 in addition: An individual sketchbook from the design work provided also collected along with a brief description of the reasoning behind your design choices.

Reading Instructions

  • Greenberg, S., Carpendale, S., Marquardt, N., & Buxton, B. (2011). Sketching User Experiences: The workbook. Morgan Kaufmann. (chapter 4-6)
  • Saffer, D. (2009). Designing for Interaction: Creating Innovative Applications and Devices (2nd Edition). New Riders. (chapter 7-8)

Lectures

Observe! Lectures are given in Swedish but we will book meetings with our English speaking students to meet one hour before or after each lecture to go through the contents of the lecture. This means that English speaking students who wish to train their Swedish can go to the Swedish lecture and then also get a shorter version of it in a small group session.

  • Lecture 6. User Interface Sketching and Paper Prototypes
  • Lecture 7. User Interface Principles
  • Lecture 8. Formative usability testing

Assignment 4: Detailing of Solutions

Presentation week 3 and test report submitted on January 19.

Group Work

Make redesign based on the results of the tests of paper prototype and build a computer prototype that is detailed in terms of interaction and visual presentation. The prototype shall be a T prototype, which means that it on the surface looks like a full working system, but you can only do a few pre-defined tasks.

You can build in Flash (Andrzejewski, 2008), HTML (Ramsay & Buley, 2008), PowerPoint / Keynote (Kelly, 2007), or Axure which is an HTML-based prototyping tool that is installed in the K2510 and K4502 (to learn the application go to http://www.axure.com/trainin) . The choice of tool depends on your design. Consult with your supervisor.

Test the prototype with at least two users per group member. Users should be representative of your target audience. If you find it difficult to recruite representative users should seek surrogate users that are as close as possible on the most critical dimensions. The tests shall include both qualitative and quantitative data and be analyzed and presented in a correct manner. Make sure everyone gets the chance to be both observer and facilitator. The test results in consequences for design and how the prototype should be redesigned (you do not have to realize the redesign) .

In this last assignment the group delivers both a written test report and an oral presentation with the support of a presentation poster that describes :

  • project as a whole
  • methodology and results of the usability test

Examples of posters from previous years are available at the course information page. The computer prototype is demonstrated at the critique session. After the critique session, we have an open poster and demo session where all groups will exhibit their posters and let interested people test the prototypes.

The written test report should be based on a template that you can find on Usability.gov (2013) and will be in addition:

  • account for a properly conducted usability test with both qualitative and quantitative data (Tullis & Albert, 2008)
  • include a description of the computer prototype with annotated screen shots
  • include as an appendix: a participation report on no more than one page

Individual Report

The individual report shall be based on personal experience done in group work. The focus is, therefore, on what you have done and observed in the context of the group's work. The instructions for individual reports and sketch books above should be followed.

  • For grade 3: The report shall, as results, include written up notes from summative tests of the computer prototype where you've been an observer. In the discussion (one page), observations and experiences you have done is analyzed and discussed.
  • For grade 4 in addition: The literature for the task should properly be used to describe and analyze the work and draw lessons from it. Analysis implies that things you have read in various sources are put againsteach other and against observation and experience to build synthesized knowledge and to draw conclusions. What we 're after learning wise is that you focus on your own personal experiences from the assignment and put them in relation to what you read. It is not enough that the literature used to describe what you did. You also have to use what you have read to say something about what you have observed and experienced, and you have to use your observations and experiences to say something about what you read.
  • For grade 5 in addition: A screencast from an individually implemented executable part of the computer prototype, submitted along with a description of it, and how you reasoned in your construction and design choices. The submission should show that you personally can construct executable interactive computer prototypes. It can either be something you built as part of the group's work or something that you built as an extention of the group's work.

Reading Instructions

Lectures

Observe! Lectures are given in Swedish but we will book meetings with our English speaking students to meet one hour before or after each lecture to go through the contents of the lecture. This means that English speaking students who wish to train their Swedish can go to the Swedish lecture and then also get a shorter version of it in a small group session.

  • Lecture 9. Computer Prototypes
  • Lecture 10. Quantitative Usability Testing 1
  • Lecture 11. Quantitative Usability Testing 2. Possible extra lecture.

Conduct

The following set of rules applies to the assignments in this course. It is a slightly modified version of IDA's general rules for labs.

Rules for examination

The assignments are in a group or individually, according to the instructions given for the course. However, examination is always individual.

It is not allowed to hand in solutions copied from other students, or from elsewhere, even though modifications have been made. If unauthorized copying or other forms of cheating is suspected, the teacher is required to make a report to the University Disciplinary Board.

You should be able to explain the details of the assignment. It is also possible that you may have to explain why you have chosen a specific solution. This applies to everyone in a group.

If you anticipate that you can not meet a deadline, contact your teacher. You may get some support and possibly a deadline at a later date. It is always better to discuss problems than to cheat.

If you do not follow the university and a course examination rules, and try to cheat, by for example plagiarizing or using unauthorized assistance, then it may result in a complaint to the University Disciplinary Board. The consequences of cheating can be a warning or suspension from studies.

Policy for presentation. A definite end date, deadline, generally apply to the submission of assignments in the course. This deadline may be during the course or at the end. If presentation is not done in time,you may have to do a new set of assignements the next time the course is offered.


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Last updated: 2013-12-02